CONTENT CURATION

The Minnesota Rising 2012 Un/Conference: Leveraging Expansive Leadership for Our Minnesota was held on Saturday, September 22, 2012 from 10:00AM – 4:30PM at DLR Group offices in Minneapolis, MN. Hosted by and for emerging leaders, the Un/Conference engaged emerging leaders across Minnesota in an energizing day of innovative learning and dialogue, skill-building, and network-building with their peers! See below for the content curated from the talented thinkers, doers, and presenters in the room that day.

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11:00am Mentorship and the Emerging Professional
Desiree Culpitt and Julia Quanrud

The Minnesota Rising Un/Conference brought together a diverse set of mentors for the panel “Mentorship and the Emerging Professional.”  Panel guests included:

  • Nancy Martel, Client Liaison at DLR Group
  • Susan Schuster, Senior Community Affairs Consultant, Public and Health Affairs at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota
  • Ben Marcy, We-Make-It Man at Bedlam Theatre, Adjunct Professor at St. Kate’s, Leadership Specialist at University of Minnesota
  • Marc Hosmer, Executive Director/CEO at Urban Boatbuilders, Non-Profit Services Program Assistant at Charities Review Council
  • Consuelo Gutierrez-Crosby, Civic Leadership Program Coordinator at Macalester College Civic Engagement Center

Seated in a circle with participants, the panelists shared their ideas and experiences with mentorship and then exchanged questions and ideas with the audience.  Key insights included:

  • Determine what kind of mentoring relationship you want. Mentor relationships can be formal or informal.  Informal mentorships lack the facilitator or program that establishes a formal mentorship; informal mentorships are about taking someone under your wing.  Formal mentorships have set goals, timelines, and outcomes.
    • If you have a formal mentorship opportunity, take it.  Opportunities are rare for formal mentorships.If you’re an informal mentor, it’s the responsibility of the mentee to manage the relationship.
    • Your boss is not your mentor.  You need to be able to show your weaknesses to a mentor, which isn’t always advisable with a boss.
  • What do mentors get out of a mentoring relationship?
    • Mentorship is about paying it forward.  Mentors are looking to return on the investment others made in them.
    • Mentors value how the relationship helps them grow, as well as the new perspectives they gain from their mentee.
  • Tips for finding a mentor:
    • Identify what you need in a mentor and look for a mentor who has that experience.
    • Network and conduct informational interviews to find your mentor.
    • Ask your boss for ideas on who could mentor you.
    • Don’t be afraid to ask people to mentor you.
  • Alternative forms of mentorship:
    • Recently, some individuals have been seeking mentors that are significantly younger than themselves, turning traditional mentoring relationships on their head.
    • Form a group of peers at other companies to get together with and share concerns.
    • Get involved in a networking group or a coaching circle.
  • Tricks for setting your mentorship up for success:
    • Read up on mentorship so that you have a knowledge base to inform what you need from the relationship.
    • Set goals and share them with your mentor.
    • Readjust and diversify your goals.
    • Self-advocacy and asking questions are critical mentee skills.
    • Trust is a two-way street.  A mentor and a mentee need to know their strengths and weeknesses and be ready to share them.
    • WIFM:  “What’s in if for me?”  Keep this acronym in mind when you have a mentor.  What is your mentor getting out of the experience?
    • Don’t let this concept get in the way of seeking a mentor, however.
    • Ask what you can do to help your mentor.  Bring your help to them.
    • When you look good, you make your mentor look good.
    • Sometimes, though, a mentor may see those benefits only with time and reflection.  It’s an investment.
    • Mentors should be good listeners and ask the mentee questions.
    • When the mentor listens, they should avoid judgment.  A good mentor is also reliable and flexible.

Recommended reading:

  • The Leader Who Had No Titles: A Modern Fable on Real Success in Business and in Life by Robin Sharma
  • Leaders of Today and Tomorrow (LOTT) Fellows Program, a formal mentorship program for college-aged and emerging professional women through the League of Women Voters.  Applications due October 12.
  • The Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota can help you find a mentor program (both youth and adult opportunities).  More information here.
  • The Amherst H. Wilder Foundation hosts Neighborhood Leadership Programs.  More information here.
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11:00am Getting Your Idea Off the Ground!
Allison Holland
Check out her prezi on “Getting Your Idea Off the Ground!
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11:00am Meaningful Engagement in Social Change – Choosing and Getting Involved with a Nonprofit
Lynette Dumalag, Katie Imholte, Katie Tharp, Stephanie Payne
See the presentation online at Issuu!
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2:00pm From Hero to Host: Leading in complexity

Rinal Ray and Leah Lundquist 

From Hero to Host:
Leading through conversations that matter
Rinal Ray & Leah
Lundquist
September 22, 2012
RESOURCES
“Leadership in the Age of Complexity.” by Margaret Wheatley
and Deborah Frieze. 2010. <http://berkana.org/berkana_articles/leadership-in-the-age-of-complexity/>
Dave Snowden explains the Cynefin Framework, a way to reframe the context in order to
determine the best problem-solving approach: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7oz366X0-8
A video from an Art of Hosting training sponsored by
InCommons in Minnesota describes the 4-Fold
Practice
, the conceptual foundation for the many participatory methods that
are considered “hosting” practices: http://vimeo.com/40051233
Art of Hosting Steward Tuesday Ryan-Hart explaining the Chaordic Path: http://vimeo.com/23211004
The concept of Divergence/Convergence
in group process acted out by participants in a January 2012 University of
Minnesota Art of Hosting training: http://youtu.be/vuMUzEaOqhE
“The Art of Powerful Questions: Catalyzing Insight,
Innovation and Action.” By Eric Vogt, Juanita Brown & David Isaacs. 2009. http://www.scribd.com/doc/18675626/Art-of-Powerful-Questions
To learn more about Art
of Hosting
:
Art of Hosting is a practice of looking for the deep patterns around groups that work and creating meetings where people can do their best work together.  Practically, it is a fusion of some very powerful participatory facilitation tools and practices (appreciative inquiry, world café, proaction café, open space technology, and circle practice).  Used together, they are a flexible way to help people lead and help groups move into connection and deep conversation and action fast. It has come from a group of practitioners who were looking for ways to support the people they were working with to work at the boundary of connection and innovation.

International Community of Practice Online
Community: http://artofhosting.ning.com/

 

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2:00pm Professional Success is as Easy as P.I.E.
Al Coleman

See his presentation online at Issuu!
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2:00pm So, You Want that Promotion? How to Use Management Theory for Success
Sarah Morris

See her presentation online at Issuu!

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